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KAMPALA CITY AND ENTEBBE TOUR

Introduction of Kampala
Kampala is the capital and largest city of Uganda. The city is divided into five boroughs that oversee local planning: Kampala Central Division, Kawempe Division, Makindye Division, Nakawa Division, and Lubaga Division. The city is coterminous with Kampala District. Surrounding Kampala is the rapidly growing Wakiso District, whose population more than doubled between 2002 and 2014 and now stands at over 2 million
Kampala was named the 13th fastest growing city on the planet, with an annual population growth rate of 4.03 percent, by City Mayors. Kampala has been ranked the best city to live in East Africa ahead of Nairobi and Kigali by Mercer, a global development consulting agency based in New York City, U.S.
Before the arrival of the British colonists, the Kabaka of Buganda had chosen the zone that would become Kampala as a hunting reserve. The area, composed of rolling hills with grassy wetlands in the valleys, was home to several species of antelope, particularly impala. When the British arrived, they called it “Hills of the Impala”. The language of the Buganda, Luganda, adopted many English words because of their interactions with the British. The Buganda translated “Hill of the Impala” as Akasozi ke’Empala – “Kasozi” meaning “hill”, “ke” meaning “of”, and “empala” the plural of “impala”. In Luganda, the words “ka’mpala” mean “that is of the impala”, in reference to a hill, and the single word “Kampala” was adopted as the name for the city that grew out of the Kabaka’s hills.
The city grew as the capital of the Buganda kingdom, from which several buildings survive, including the Kasubi Tombs (built in 1881), the Lubiri Palace, the Buganda Parliament and the Buganda Court of Justice. In 1890, British colonial administrator Frederick Lugard constructed a forum along Mengo Hill within the city, which allowed for the British to occupy much of the territory controlled by the Buganda, including Kampala. In 1894, the British government officially established a protectorate within this territory, and in 1896, the protectorate expanded to cover the Ankole, Toro Kingdom, and Bunyoro kingdoms as well. In 1905, the British government formally declared the entire territory to be a British colony. From that time until the independence of the country in 1962, the capital was relocated to Entebbe, although the city continued to be the primary economic and manufacturing location for Uganda. In 1922, the Makerere Technical Institute, now known as Makerere University, started as the first collegiate institution both within Kampala, and within the British colonies on the east coast of Africa. Following the 1962 independence, Milton Obote became president of Uganda, and held the position until 1971, when former sergeant Idi Amin defeated his government in a military coup. He proceeded to expel all Asian residents living within Kampala, and attacked the Jewish population living within the city. In 1978, he invaded the neighboring country of Tanzania, and in turn, the government there started the Uganda–Tanzania War, which created severe damage to the buildings of Kampala. Since then, the city has since then been rebuilt with constructions of new construction of hotels, banks, shopping malls, educational institutions, and hospitals and the improvement of war torn buildings and infrastructure. Traditionally, Kampala was a city of seven hills, but over time it has come to have a lot more.

DAY 1: Depart from the Hotel in Kampala at 7.30 Am and drive 12 Kms to Namugongo Martyrs shrine where 22 Catholic Martyrs were burnt to death in 1886 on the orders of Kabaka Mwanga. Also located in this area are the Protestants Martyrs shrine and a Muslim memorial shrine. Thereafter drive to Namboole Stadium named after Nelson Mandela before visiting the Uganda National Museum. Have Lunch and continue to the Kabaka’s Palace in Mengo and the Man made Lake of the Buganda Kingdom constructed in 1885 – 1888 for King Mwanga. Reach the Bahai Temple on Kikaya hill 6 km from Kampala City, home to Bahai’s adherents and the only one of its kind on the continent. Thereafter return to the City for a picturesque tour of Mounuments and Memorials that will include the Parliament, Independence statue, King Fredrick Mutesa’s Statue and Common Wealth Heads of States meeting Monument and finally the National Theatre at the Cultural village for shopping of Art and Crafts and thereafter return to your hotel.



Introduction of Entebbe
Entebbe is a major town in Central Uganda. On a Lake Victoria peninsula, approximately 37 kilometres (23 mi) southwest of the Ugandan capital, Kampala, it was once the seat of government for the Protectorate of Uganda prior to independence, in 1962. Entebbe is the location of Entebbe International Airport, Uganda’s largest commercial and military airport, best known for the dramatic rescue of 100 hostages kidnapped by the resistance group of the PFLP-EO and Revolutionary Cells (RZ) organizations. Entebbe is also the location of State House, the official office and residence of the President of Uganda.
The word came from Luganda language e ntebe which means ‘seat’ / ‘chair’. Entebbe was the seat of the colonial governor in the early 1900s, when the country was a British protectorate, and is now the location of the official office and residence of the President of Uganda, hence the name. Entebbe is the seat of power in the country.
Entebbe sits on the northern shores of Lake Victoria, Africa’s largest lake. The town is situated in Wakiso District, approximately 37 kilometres (23 mi) southwest of Kampala, Uganda’s capital and largest city. The municipality is located on a peninsula into Lake Victoria, covering a total area of 56.2 square kilometres (21.7 sq mi), out of which 20 km2 (7.7 sq mi) is water. The coordinates of Entebbe are:0°03’00.0″N, 32°27’36.0″E (Latitude:0.0500; Longitude:32.4600).
Entebbe”, in the local Luganda language, means a “seat” and was probably named that because it was the place where a Baganda chief sat to adjudicate legal cases. It first became a British colonial administrative and commercial centre in 1893 when Sir Gerald Portal, a colonial Commissioner, used it as a base. Port Bell went on to become Kampala’s harbour. Although no ships dock there now, there is still a jetty, which was used by Lake Victoria ferries. Entebbe is perhaps best known to Europeans as the home of Entebbe International Airport, the main international airport of Uganda, which was first opened in 1929. Entebbe airport was the scene of a hostage situation and a rescue operation in 4 July 1976, when soldiers from an elite unit of the Israeli army freed over 100 hostages following a hijacking by a group of Palestinian and German militia. It was also from this airport that Queen Elizabeth II departed Africa to return to England in 1952 when she learned of her father’s death and that she had become Queen.

DAY 2: Depart Kampala city at 8.00am and drive to Entebbe for a Natures walk in the Botanical Gardens from where Chimpanzees, Tree species, Birds, Insects and Butterflies will be sighted. Thereafter visit the Uganda Wildlife Education Centre to acquaint yourself with Animals, Reptiles, Monkeys and Birds kept in the home. Have Lunch in Entebbe town and have an excursion of Kigungu landing Site where the First Catholic Missionaries Fr Loudel and Bro Amans arrived from. Interact with the communities of the Fishing village before driving back to Kampala where you will be dropped at your pick-up point. A Boat trip to Ngamba Island will be an optional selection for those interested in Chimpanzee tracking and watching.

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